Skin Care Tip: Massage That Mug

October 04, 2014

By relaxing muscles and connective tissue, massaging the face softens expression-induced lines around your eyes, lips and brows, helps expel acne-causing toxins and de-puffs and brightens the eye area. It also increases circulation, oxygenating the blood and encouraging the presence of fresh, healing red blood cells.

1. Start on the cheeks. Draw big circles using your fingers or knuckles, moving upward.

2. On one side of the face at a time, rub from the midjaw to the cheekbone with long upward strokes, pressing firmly for a moment at the top.

3. Work smile lines with upward strokes, from the corners of the mouth to the corners of the nose.

4. With your fingers, lift and hold both brows to open up the eye area. Rub in a circle around the eye socket out to the temples, eventually expanding to include the forehead.

5. To plump lips, use thumbs and index fingers to quickly pluck all across the top and bottom lip, which stimulates blood flow.

[From the WSJ]

 




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