Fatty Acids are the Key

March 10, 2015

Specifically, lineolic vs. oleic acid. Lineolic acid is a fatty acid that is naturally present in your skin’s sebum (the oil produced by your skin to protect it from the elements). A deficiency in lineolic acid causes the skin to produce sebum with high levels of oleic acid which is dry and sticky and may lead to blackheads and clogged pores.

Simply put, more lineolic acid means more free-flowing sebum, which means bacteria and junk won’t get trapped in your pores causing unsightly sore bumps and spots.

If your skin is prone to congestion, you should set your sights on lineolic acid. Eat plenty of sunflower seeds, cashews and flax seeds and use sunflower, safflower and sesame oil for cooking or in salads. AND apply oils high in lineolic acid to your face. Over time, your skin will replace the oleic acid with lineolic and will become more balanced, toned and clear of blemishes.


Folks are afraid to put oil on their acneic skin, but the key is choosing the right oils. In the MMT face line, we formulate with a mindfulness toward blemish prone skin and use oils high in lineolic acid. Namely, we love hempseed, sesame and sunflower (not high oleic, duh). We tend to stay away from using coconut, sea buckthorn and sweet almond oil on our faces since these oils are on the oleic side of the spectrum. If your skin is dry, you may use any of those in combination with a lineolic-rich oil for added protection.

Trying to deal with your skin’s breakouts? Check out our blog post with a customized facial regime for ALL skin types. 




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